wholesale Mary outlet sale and sale O'Neil sale

wholesale Mary outlet sale and sale O'Neil sale

wholesale Mary outlet sale and sale O'Neil sale

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A luminous work of fiction that celebrates the uncommon in common lives, and the redemptive power of love.

Mary and O''Neil frequently marveled at how, of all the lives they might have led, they had somehow found this one together. When they met at the Philadelphia high school where they''d come to teach, each had suffered a profound loss that had not healed. How likely was it that they could learn to trust, much less love, again?

In Justin Cronin''s tender, heartwise debut, eight stories trace the lives of these two vulnerable young people as they rediscover in each other a world alive with promise and hope.

From the formative experiences of their early adulthood to marriage, parenthood, and beyond, each chapter illuminates the moments of grace that enable Mary and O''Neil to make peace with the deep emotional legacies that haunt them: the sudden, mysterious death of O''Neil''s parents, Mary''s long-ago decision to end a pregnancy, O''Neil''s sister''s battle with illness and a troubled marriage.

Like the work of Alice Hoffman, Cronin''s fiction resonates with magical nuance and unexpected encounters -- a beautiful young girl who appears to Mary one night, draped in a cloud of stars; an autistic child who reveals a life-changing secret; a woman O''Neil mistakenly dials the night their first child is born -- that edify this young couple''s intimate bond and affirm their faith in the future.

From Publishers Weekly

The title of Cronin''s debut collection of eight interconnected stories, set between 1979 and the present, implies that the content will be devoted to the relationship between the eponymous duo. Instead, they don''t appear in the same tale until halfway through, detailing their marriage in their early 30s after both become teachers. Before this, there''s a lengthy opening story concerning the events leading up to the accidental death of O''Neil''s parents, Arthur and Miriam; another story on how O''Neil and his older sister, Kay, cope with the aftermath; and a third about the abortion Mary has at the age of 22. After the wedding, the stories still don''t always focus on the pair, with one devoted solely to Kay''s own dysfunctional marriage. Cronin, a graduate of the Iowa Writers'' Workshop, is an accomplished craftsman, and at times his prose is quite moving and beautiful, though the sadness he channels is too often uninflected by humor. Playing out variations on the theme of the inability of parents and children to truly know one another, Cronin is capable of creating fresh poignancy. Readers interested in going straight to the best of the collection should head for "Orphans" and "A Gathering of Shades," in which the author affectingly paints how the two siblings help each other through the pain of living and dying, showcasing the real love story here. Agent, Ellen Levine. (Feb. 13) Forecast: This is a promising debut collection, and national print advertising in the New Yorker and alternative weeklies should target the appropriate readership. Sponsorship announcements will also feature the title on NPR.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

It is 1979, and 19-year-old O''Neil Burke has it all. He''s in love, successful in college, and warmed by the affection of his parents and older sister Kay. After a weekend visiting their son, the Burkes, protecting each other from dark, unshared secrets, drive off an icy embankment and die. O''Neil''s mounting losses include his girl, his career ambitions, and any sense of direction. Eventually, he finds his way back into a pleasant life, teaching high school English in Philadelphia and marrying Mary. More sorrow solidifies the bond between O''Neil and his sister when she fights a losing battle with cancer in her late thirties. Cronin''s key mistake in this fine series of linked short stories about a family weathering crushing blows is indicated by his misleading title. Mary, who makes her first appearance nearly 100 pages into the book, is not nearly the presence that O''Neil, his parents, and his sister are. This is too bad, as the scenes between Mary and O''Neil are rich with affectionate humor, leaving the reader wanting more. Nevertheless, this is a worthy first effort by a novelist worth watching.
-DBeth E. Andersen, Ann Arbor Dist. Lib., MI
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

This is a story of fidelity, pregnancy, maturation, cancer, and death--all well-tread themes in current fiction. Presented as "a novel in stories," we meet a middle-aged couple coping with crises, whose troubles seem to be transferred inevitably onto their children. The bulk of the novel centers on one of these children, O''Neil, and his wife, Mary, and relays the happenings of their individual lives as they graduate from college, meet girls and boys, and eventually settle down with each other. The utilization of worn-out ideas often burdens the novel, restraining it from ever taking flight. But despite being heavy in places, the novel is generally well written. Cronin''s use of language, when crisp and inventive, allows the characters a freedom to develop within the tired concepts, which in turn uplifts the novel. Although his literary influences frequently peek through, particularly his fondness for Updike, should first-novelist Cronin continue shaping his voice, he will be an author to keep your eyes open for. Jeff Snowbarger
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"His prose is quite moving and beautiful ... playing out variations on the theme of the inability of parents and children to truly know one another, Cronin is capable of creating fresh poignancy."
-- Publishers Weekly

Advance praise for Mary and O''Neil:

" Mary and O''Neil is, pure and simple, one of the most tender, moving, and beautiful books I have read in years. Justin Cronin writes about love -- between parents and children, between siblings, and, yes, between lovers -- with a wisdom and humor that''s rare."
-- Chris Bohjalian, author of Trans-Sister Radio and Midwives

"Justin Cronin''s unusual and admirable book offers -- in the tradition of Elizabeth Strout''s Amy and Isabelle -- a rare combination of brilliant prose, precise feeling, and omniscient wisdom regarding the complicated bonds between generations. A wonderful debut."
-- Andrea Barrett, National Book Award-winning author of Ship Fever and The Voyage of the Narwhal

" Mary and O''Neil is written with an aching beauty -- for the passage of time, the yearning for peace, the haunting sorrows and small joys that all of us know in life. There is wisdom in these pages. There is compassion and understanding. But most of all, this book contains genuine love. My hat is off to Justin Cronin. Thank you for giving such a gorgeous book to the world."
-- Chris Offutt, author of Kentucky Straight and Out of the Woods

"Suffused with a light grace which belies the formal elegance of its construction, Justin Cronin''s Mary and O''Neil is that rare thing: a wholly engrossing story of the ordinary life. "
-- Madison Smartt Bell, author of All Souls'' Rising

"Justin Cronin writes beautiful prose that aches with its sense of passing time. He understands youth and he writes with clarity of age. He evokes with precision the glories of the senses. He was born to tell stories, and he narrates his characters with penetrating wit as well as loyalty. His book has left me gasping with admiration, with appreciation, and of course with envy."
-- Frederick Busch, author of The Night Inspector

"A writer of astonishing gifts. Mary and O''Neil is honest, meticulous, and ultimately heartbreaking."
-- Gary Krist, author of Chaos Theory

" Mary and O''Neil is one of those rare novels whose characters and events are so vivid they seem to become part of one''s own life. Justin Cronin demonstrates an extraordinary instinct for the essential moment, the resonant line, and the lasting image. This is a wonderful novel, luminous and compassionate, and very hard to put down."
-- Tom Drury, author of The End of Vandalism

From the Inside Flap

ork of fiction that celebrates the uncommon in common lives, and the redemptive power of love.

Mary and O''Neil frequently marveled at how, of all the lives they might have led, they had somehow found this one together. When they met at the Philadelphia high school where they''d come to teach, each had suffered a profound loss that had not healed. How likely was it that they could learn to trust, much less love, again?

In Justin Cronin''s tender, heartwise debut, eight stories trace the lives of these two vulnerable young people as they rediscover in each other a world alive with promise and hope.

From the formative experiences of their early adulthood to marriage, parenthood, and beyond, each chapter illuminates the moments of grace that enable Mary and O''Neil to make peace with the deep emotional legacies that haunt them: the sudden, mysterious death of O''Neil''s parents, Mary''s long-ago decision to end a pregnancy, O''Neil''s sister''s battle with illness and a

About the Author

Justin Cronin is a graduate of the Iowa Writers'' Workshop and associate professor of English at La Salle University. His work has appeared in many literary journals, including Epoch, Greensboro Review, and Crescent Review, and in The Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine. He lives with his wife and their young daughter in Philadelphia.

From The Washington Post

Readers will recognize something of themselves in the instincts and second thoughts of these characters.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Last of the Leaves

November 1979


Arthur in darkness -- drifting, drifting -- the planet spinning toward dawn: he awakens in gray November daybreak to the sounds of running water and a great arm brushing the side of his house. The wind, he thinks, the wind; the end of autumn, the last of the leaves pulled away. The running water, he understands, was never real. He lies in the dark of the bedroom he shares with his wife, waiting for the dream to fade -- a dream in which, together, they sail over a cliff into blackness. What else? A sense of water below, a lake or stream, Miriam''s hand in his, of everything loosed from the earth; a feeling like accomplishment, shapes fitting together with mathematical precision, all the equations of the heavens ringing. A dream of final happiness, in which they, Arthur and Miriam, together, at the last, die.

Arthur rises, takes a wool sweater from the chair by his bed, pushes his feet into the warm pockets of his slippers. He draws the sweater over his head, his twisted pajama top; he puts on his glasses and pauses, letting his eyes, cakey with sleep, adjust. In the feeble, trembling light (The moon? A streetlamp? The day is hours off), he discerns the form of his wife, a crescent-shaped ridge beneath the blankets, and knows her face and body are turned away from him, toward the window, open two inches to admit a trail of cold night air. How is it possible he knows he is going to die? And that the thought does not grieve him? But the feeling, he believes, is just a tattered remnant of his dream, still near to him in the dark and cold of the predawn room, Arthur still, after all, in his pajamas; by breakfast it will recede, by lunchtime it will vanish altogether, dissolving into the day like a drop of iodine in water. Is it possible he is still asleep? And Arthur realizes this is probably true; he is fast asleep, standing in the icy bedroom, knees locked, his chin lolled forward into the downy fan of hair on his chest; he is, in fact, about to snore.

...To snore! And with this his head snaps to attention, his eyes fly open; he is, at last and truly, awake, dropped as if from a great height to land, perfectly uninjured, here. The living, breathing Arthur. But to be fifty-six years old, and dream of death, and not be afraid; this thought has somehow survived the journey into Arthur''s encroaching day, hardening to a kernel of certainty in his heart. He shakes his head at the oddness of this fact, then at the coldness of the room, Christ Almighty; even in the dark Arthur can see his breath billowing before him like a cloud of crystals. Below the blue bulk of their bedding his wife adjusts herself, pulling the blankets tighter, as if to meet his thought; a hump disengages itself from the small of her back, travels the width of the mattress to Arthur''s side, and vanishes with the sound of four paws striking the wide-plank floor. A flash of blond tail: the cat, Nestor, awakened from its spot between them, darts through the bedskirts and is gone. Enough, Arthur thinks; onward. He closes the window -- a sudden silence, the wind sealed away from him -- and departs the bedroom, shutting the door with a muffled snap. Behind it his wife will sleep for hours.

Downstairs, his mind on nothing, Arthur fills a carafe with water from the kitchen sink, pours it into the coffeemaker, scoops the fragrant dirt of ground beans into the paper filter, and turns on the machine; he sits at the table and waits. Dear God, he thinks, thank you for this day, this cup of coffee (not long now; the machine, sighing good-naturedly to life, exhales a plume of steam and releases a ricocheting stream into the pot), and while we''re at it, God, thank you for the beauty of this time of year, the leaves on the trees by the river where I walked yesterday, thank you for the sky and earth, which you, I guess, in your wisdom, will have to cover with snow for a while, so we don''t forget who''s boss. I like the winter fine, but it would be nice if it wasn''t a bad one. This is just a suggestion. Amen.

Arthur opens his eyes; a pale light has begun to gather outside, deepening his view of the sloping yard and the tangle of woods beyond. He pours the coffee, spoons in sugar, softens its color with a dollop of milk; he stands at the counter and drinks. Not a bad one, please.

Today is the day they will drive six hours north to see their son, a sophomore in college, lately and totally (or so he says, his voice on the phone as bright as a cork shot from a bottle: totally, Pop) in love. Arthur doesn''t doubt this is the case, and why should he? What the hell? Why not be in love? He sits at the kitchen table, dawn creeping up to his house; he thinks of the long day and the drive through mountains ahead of him, the pleasure he will feel when, his back and eyes sore from hours on the road, he pulls into the dormitory lot and his boy, long legged and smiling and smart, bounds down the stairs to greet them. In the foyer with its bulletin boards and scuffed linoleum and pay phone, the young lady watches them through the dirty glass. Susan? Suzie? Arthur reviews the details. Parents from Boston, JV field hockey first string (again the memory of his son''s voice, brightly laughing: But her ankles aren''t thick, the way they get, you know, Pop?); an English class they took together, Shakespeare or Shelley or Pope, and the way she read a certain poem in class, the thrilling confidence in her voice cementing the erotic bargain between them. (I mean, she looked right at me, Pop, the whole time, I think she had the thing memorized; you should have seen it, the whole class knew!) And Arthur knows what his son is saying to him: Here I am. Look. And Arthur does: Susan or Suzie (Sarah?), fresh from her triumphs of love and smarts in the marbled halls of academe, banging the hard rubber ball downfield on the bluest blue New Hampshire autumn day.

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4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

AJ
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic!
Reviewed in the United States on March 10, 2017
This was one of the most amazing and spectacular books I''ve read from a first time author in a long time. The prose was beautiful, the story was engaging, and the characters were perfectly crafted. I fell in love with Justin Cronin''s work during the passage trilogy (which... See more
This was one of the most amazing and spectacular books I''ve read from a first time author in a long time. The prose was beautiful, the story was engaging, and the characters were perfectly crafted. I fell in love with Justin Cronin''s work during the passage trilogy (which I''ve re read twice) and then after going to his book signing for City of Mirrors last summer, I decided to give Summer Guest (which is also spectacular BTW) and Mary and O''Neil a try. Both books are quite outside my normal preferred genre of suspense and thrillers, but I couldn''t put either of them down.

This story is essentially the story of O''Neil going from a young adult into an adult and the struggles that go along with your interpersonal growth. It dealt with difficult real world subjects that happen to lots of people like death, major illnesses, marriage, abortion, childbirth, and dealing with a special needs child. While those subject are far from entertaining, the way they are used to move the character along felt genuine and I was able to see reflections of my own life and growth in the stories. The story is told in approximately 8 separate stories with a different primary character all which tie back together.
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Elise in Palm Springs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the Best Books I''ve Read in a Long, Long Time
Reviewed in the United States on August 14, 2020
Wow! Mary and O''Neil is the first book I''ve read by Justin Cronin but it won''t be the last. I was completely knocked out by Cronin''s prose. In fact, I re-read the first seven paragraphs over and over, trying to figure out how certain writers craft sentences in such a way... See more
Wow! Mary and O''Neil is the first book I''ve read by Justin Cronin but it won''t be the last. I was completely knocked out by Cronin''s prose. In fact, I re-read the first seven paragraphs over and over, trying to figure out how certain writers craft sentences in such a way that they are like poetry. So full of imagery and meaning...such aching, overwhelming beauty. How do they do it when other writers just set down facts? Cronin makes you see, feel, smell, and taste. And with such(!) economy! Within the first two pages, he''s painted a brilliantly clear picture of the characters, and he''s so convincingly grabbed your attention and caring for them that you can''t wait to keep reading, to find out more! Amazing. (I read this book in two long sessions.)

While the book is titled "Mary and O''Neil", you also get to know the other characters so well that until the very end of the book it remained a mystery to me why the title focused only on those two. Every person in the story is key to that understanding.

Oh, and the book''s ending! It was one of the most beautiful scenes I''ve ever read! Like that beginning seven paragraphs (and many times throughout the book) I re-read the last few pages over and over, marveling at how Cronin pulled it off.

Highly recommended!
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Flower of Evil
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a total waste of time, but there are hundreds of books I''ve enjoyed a lot more than this one....
Reviewed in the United States on September 14, 2015
Most books I finish because I can''t wait to keep reading them, but not so with this one; I basically finished it because I had paid for it, and because it was downloaded onto my Kindle for desktop so I could access it without an Internet connection. :-) Also, because it''s... See more
Most books I finish because I can''t wait to keep reading them, but not so with this one; I basically finished it because I had paid for it, and because it was downloaded onto my Kindle for desktop so I could access it without an Internet connection. :-) Also, because it''s a set of stories rather than a true novel, the author refers, throughout the book, back to major events in the plot as if the reader were unaware of them. This is a flaw in the editing, and could/should have been corrected as it really undermines the "novel" form. Although I wouldn''t recommend this book (novel? story collection?) to friends, I am intrigued enough by the writing to check out a later novel by the same author: The Passage. Based on its reviews (and the book''s popularity) it sounds like he managed something special with that one, and I''m looking forward to reading it.

I can make one positive point about Mary and O''Neil -- the descriptions of cancer treatments are quite realistic, including the camaraderie one can experience in the chemotherapy rooms and the cumulative nature of the fatigue / side effects. While I have not had to endure this myself, someone very close to me has, and the cancer treatment scenes in this novel more or less accurately reflect his experiences.

Back to negatives, however, I found the book''s discussions of abortion to be a unrealistically over-the-top -- the author makes it sound like every woman who has ever had an abortion is later traumatized by it, which in fact is far from true. Also, I wondered if Mary was heading toward psychosis at some point -- based on things she experienced and saw in the book (I won''t give details here) -- but I suppose you''ll just have to read it if you want to know what I''m talking about, since I don''t want to give spoilers....

Also, the descriptions of physical locations in this book lacked important detail. For example, I''m from the St. Louis area, and when one of the characters is trying to tell a child about St. Louis he doesn''t even mention Busch Stadium, or the Mississippi River / the Riverfront, or the ARCH, for goodness sake. To me this shows a lack of research or at least a lack of observation about important aspects of the book''s settings.

And finally, character development -- there were a lot of inconsistencies. Kay is first depicted as quite cold and "mysterious", but then turns out to be this heroic, always loving and always supportive sister to O''Neil -- that''s weird. The mom (I have already forgotten her name) is portrayed as suffering from a reverse Oedipal complex toward her son, but then reverses that when she meets her son''s very Renaissance-woman girlfriend -- who is possibly the most likable character in the book, though she only appears on a few pages. O''Neil''s mother also seems shrewish toward Jack, Kay''s husband, and comes off as pretty unappealing as a result of all that, and then her husband (O''Neil''s dad) comes off as a cold fish who wants to cheat on his wife, but perhaps doesn''t have the courage (or something like that?). The plot device involving them seems unrealistically dramatic too (again, I won''t give details). The total effect is that it''s hard to embrace these characters, as it''s difficult to really know them. I also don''t feel like I know much about Mary at all, even though her name appears in the title of the book.... and so on.

That said, I admire anyone who can pen a readable first novel, and Mr. Cronin has accomplished that -- it just seems that, with more thorough editing and plot/character/form/setting development, this could have been a much better book.
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F. B. H. In TN
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this book now!
Reviewed in the United States on April 21, 2019
The story drew me in, and the writing compelled me to stay. I read Mr. Cronin''s Passage trilogy first and worked my way backwards. It was startling to experience his his fully formed gifts as a writer on display in his first novel. Give yourself a gift and buy Mary and... See more
The story drew me in, and the writing compelled me to stay. I read Mr. Cronin''s Passage trilogy first and worked my way backwards. It was startling to experience his his fully formed gifts as a writer on display in his first novel. Give yourself a gift and buy Mary and O''Neill. It will bring you joy.
5 people found this helpful
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Teestorman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved this book!
Reviewed in the United States on June 27, 2019
I read this because I enjoyed so much Mr. Cronin’s Passage trilogy. While this is a completely different kind of book, I enjoyed it just as much! Very thoughtful and heartfelt, with interesting characters I cared about.
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Nancy B.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Engrossing read
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2019
A family saga that takes several generations before you get to Mary and O’Neil. But it’s worth it. Cronin makes you care deeply about each of his characters. Well worth reading.
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Robert Ezerman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Masterful writing
Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2017
Cronin''s first published novel, I went after it after being mesmerized by his Passage trilogy and was not disappointed. Memorable characters, pithy writing, a book for quite moments when one can patiently let the lovely flow of language spin the tale.
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sam4erica
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thank you, Mr. Cronin.
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2019
This is a beautifully told story about relationships. Some are more substantial than others. Some are formed by the bond of marriage, others by blood. Some are enviable, others loathsome. It is a novel with heartache I never want to experience and selfless love that is... See more
This is a beautifully told story about relationships. Some are more substantial than others. Some are formed by the bond of marriage, others by blood. Some are enviable, others loathsome. It is a novel with heartache I never want to experience and selfless love that is moving. In the end I was brought to tears by an author whose compelling narrative transported me away from the here and now. What more can a reader desire?
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Top reviews from other countries

Joanne Kent
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A total gem.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 17, 2017
The best book I have read for years. A lesson to other authors on how to write moving narrative about everyday life. So poignant and memorable. Am recommending it to all my bookish friends. Totally different to the post vampire apocolypse trilogy (although I loved that too)...See more
The best book I have read for years. A lesson to other authors on how to write moving narrative about everyday life. So poignant and memorable. Am recommending it to all my bookish friends. Totally different to the post vampire apocolypse trilogy (although I loved that too) Reminds me of Colleen McCulloch - The Ladies of Missalongi which is another perfect read.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 8, 2020
Enjoyed this
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Susanne Mcconnell
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mary and O''Neil
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 29, 2012
The first Justin Cronan book i read was The Passage which is one of the best books i have read so was interested in reading more of his work. Mary and O''Neil ,to be very honest,was a dissappointment.An ok storyline but nothing to talk about.
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Martin Wheeler
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 30, 2014
Excellent
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denise
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
mmmmm
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 17, 2013
Not sure about this book...after reading his other books The Twelve and The Passage I think Justin needs to stick to what he does best and thats writting horror
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