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Disc, inner sleeve and jacket in good condition; partial split on top edge of jacket; Ships directly from Amazon! Tracking number provided with every order.
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Description

Fourth studio album released in October, 1979 Certified Platinum in the USA, where it spent a year on the Billboard chart, peaking at #17. Featuring the singles, Dreaming, Union City Blue, The Hardest Part, and Atomic.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

J. HARMON
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Possibly the best BLONDIE album of all-time
Reviewed in the United States on April 26, 2013
I agree with the review written by Rachel Lae, this is a phenomenal album that is head and shoulders above the more popular AUTOAMERICAN and, as an entire album compares favorably to PARALLEL LINES. I was not a big BLONDIE fan, having owned their GREATEST HITS... See more
I agree with the review written by Rachel Lae, this is a phenomenal album that is head and shoulders above the more popular AUTOAMERICAN and, as an entire album compares favorably to PARALLEL LINES.

I was not a big BLONDIE fan, having owned their GREATEST HITS package and the original PARALLEL LINES disc only for many years.

Not until I obtained a more recent GREATEST HITS package with an additional DVD of BLONDIE music videos did I discover the song UNION CITY BLUE, which immediately impressed my musical heart to become my favorite BLONDIE track of all-time and one of my favorite rock songs ever... The lyrics are a tad simple but that rich sound is just mind-blowing in its beauty.

Then, for the same album to possess one of the best damn rock songs of all-time DREAMING, just causes my mind to boggle as to why these two songs weren''t number 1 hits and why this album isn''t caonsidered BLONDIES'' best ever.

Clem Burkes drum work on both of the fore-mentioned songs is just brilliant. I have tried looking for interviews in effort to learn how his drum work was recorded (single tracks or extensive overdubs, etc.) Why he was not regarded as one of the best drummers of his era I will never understand. ATOMIC also highlighted his drum work, along with the bass and guitar work of Nigel Harrison and Chris Stein respectively.

Basically, this band understood the nature of good hooks. They had fabulous ears for melody and tone which allowed them to create singular pieces of brilliant music that stands alone yet sounds inherently pleasing (such as a song like TIDE IS HIGH.)

The track SHAYLA is a mystery in its context and is nothing but haunting in its delivery. This song also resonates in me as one of the finest BLONDIE tracks of all time.

This album has a few filler tracks but overall is nothing short of a work of art. Just a brilliant album by an tragically under-rated band. For any BLONDIE fans this album is a must-own. For any fan of 1980''s music this album is a necessity. For everyone else, with any sense of interest in BLONDIE, I would start with this album, even though PARALLEL LINES and AUTOAMERICAN are more popular. As with this album, this band was far better than the sum of their hits.

By the way, the accompanying DVD propels this album over PARALLEL LINES, in my sincere opinion. What a contrast are the primitive videos of those days compared to the overly produced junk of modern day music.

Considering there are 4 distinct versions of this album out on Compact Disc, be certain in what you are ordering. First, one remastered version is the music disc alone with 4 bonus tracks (mostly live cuts), there are another two remastered versions of the music disc and the DVD of the album tracks 12 videos. The European version (with the cardboard multi-fold sleeve), has an international DVD version that does not play on U.S. players. The last version is the original CD version in un-remastered form.

As for the album, it is simply a GREAT ALBUM, which makes me wonder why this album was not a huge hit.
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Doc Safari
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Best Blondie Video EVER!
Reviewed in the United States on August 19, 2007
Blondie doesn''t get credit for much. One thing the band SHOULD get credit for is helping to pioneer the concept of music videos. Whether the video album to Eat to the Beat was the first or simply one of the first attempts to make a video for each song on an entire album,... See more
Blondie doesn''t get credit for much. One thing the band SHOULD get credit for is helping to pioneer the concept of music videos. Whether the video album to Eat to the Beat was the first or simply one of the first attempts to make a video for each song on an entire album, this DVD''s historic importance cannot be overstated.

Because it is a pioneering effort, the accepted format of displaying the credits discreetly in one corner of the video has not yet been invented. Instead, each video has a "title page" which eats up the first few seconds of each video. That''s annoying, but that is my one and only minor criticism. The excitement of the videos more than makes up for this minor "annoyance."

The lowdown? In a word: fantastic! The picture quality is head and shoulders above Blondie''s Greatest Video Hits or the Musikladen DVD. It is on a par with the picture quality of the Glasgow performance: i.e., the picture quality is nearly High Definition considering how old these tapes are.

The videos themselves are primarily variations on the "show the band performing" theme. Remember, this is prehistoric. Don''t let that stop you from owning the best Blondie video EVER. I waited 28 years to see this, and it was worth the wait. I question the need to include the CD album with the DVD in the package, because most people who purchase this will probably already own the plain CD. That also increases the price, and unfortunately may make some people pass on an excellent and essential Blondie video document. For my own tastes, never again will I simply want to listen to the album without viewing the accompanying videos. It''s that good. And if you get tired of watching Debbie Harry in her prime there is something seriously wrong with you.

If you do not own this you are not a true Blondie fan. ''Nuff Said.
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Chris D.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Make it magnificent
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2005
Eat To The Beat is a slight letdown after the previous year''s Parallel Lines - as it could hardly help but be. The musical direction is oriented more towards pop than punk, and the band displays more variety to their sound, but the results are a little inconsistent,... See more
Eat To The Beat is a slight letdown after the previous year''s Parallel Lines - as it could hardly help but be. The musical direction is oriented more towards pop than punk, and the band displays more variety to their sound, but the results are a little inconsistent, especially towards the end of the album. But don''t get me wrong - this is an excellent album, and it contains some of Blondie''s best work. It''s only in comparison to Parallel Lines that Eat To The Beat suffers at all - it''s almost as good as Parallel Lines, and it is far, far better than the following year''s Autoamerican.

There are no complaints with the first half, which kicks off with the classic "Dreaming", a great rocker that features some truly amazing drumming by Clem Burke - the song feels like one long drum roll at times. Then the band explores their funky side with "The Hardest Part". "Union City Blue" and "Shayla" are both excellent, more moderately-paced songs - the former more towards the rock end of the scale and the latter more like a ballad, and the following title track shows that they hadn''t totally abandoned their punk roots - definitely a full-on rocker, which barrels along like a steamroller. Rounding out the first half is "Accidents Never Happen", a great song that seems slower than it actually is in comparison to the preceding track. It''s one of my personal favorites on the disc.

"Die Young Stay Pretty" is a loping reggae-influenced track. The band would revisit this style with much greater success with "The Tide Is High" on Autoamerican. Next is "Slow Motion", which harkens back to Blondie''s ongoing fascination with 60''s pop - it has a definite " vintage girl group" feel. "Atomic" revisits the disco territory that the band had had such big success with on the previous album ("Heart Of Glass"). "Atomic" features some great twangy, western-style guitar work (supposedly played on a Gretsch borrowed from Bruce Springsteen, who happened to be at the same recording studio), and is an outstanding song overall. Then "Sound-A-Sleep" comes along...I guess you would call it a lullabye, and it kills the album''s momentum dead. It doesn''t help that it''s followed up by "Victor", which is one of those "love it or hate it" songs that defy easy classification...Debbie Harry screams a bit, though! The original album finishes with "Living In The Real World", another rocker in the same vein as "Eat To The Beat" - a definite high note to end on.

There are four bonus live tracks, including covers of "Heroes" and "Ring of Fire", and some interesting liner notes by producer Mike Chapman. The lyrics are not included, but all in all, it''s a decent re-issue of a classic album. After 26 years, most of this album sounds fresher and edgier than most of what gets put out nowadays.

If you are just familiar with Best Of Blondie and are looking to expand your Blondie collection, I would suggest starting with Parallel Lines first, and then picking this one up second, but they are both very enjoyable, and you should be happy with either one. I really believe that this was the last great album they put out, even though they still had a few major hits left in them.
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Timothy T. Ward
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
She made it Magnificent!
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2007
By October of 1979, Blondie were a part of the rock mainstream thanks to the strength of "Heart of Glass," and Debbie Harry''s Marilyn Monroeish sex appeal, both of which propelled the Parallel Lines album into the Top 10 in May of that year. Eat to the Beat was the first... See more
By October of 1979, Blondie were a part of the rock mainstream thanks to the strength of "Heart of Glass," and Debbie Harry''s Marilyn Monroeish sex appeal, both of which propelled the Parallel Lines album into the Top 10 in May of that year. Eat to the Beat was the first Blondie album the public was waiting for and while it received great reviews and eventually went platinum, it seemed a little underrated at the time or perhaps just a little neglected as Parallel Lines is what many fans were still hooked on. But I would say Eat to the Beat is a slightly better album because it fully absorbed the New Wave sound into the rock mainstream. New Wave was no longer a label nor a safer term to describe punk as it became mass-accepted. The band once said this was their quickest album to record, just having come off the road before beginning their first U.S. tour as headliners. This is also their most raw and rockin'' album. Debbie''s lyrics have never had more poetic expression on songs like "Dreaming," and "Union City Blue," while her voice has never had more edgy allure. Harry''s allure continues on songs like "Shayla", the pop lullaby "Sound-A-Sleep," and "Atomic,"(now a dance classic having been remixed numerous times). But Harry never sounded more punk as she screams from the depths of her soul, "I don''t want you to go, please don''t leave me alone," on "Victor." What many fans may not remember is how this album''s attempt to cover several musical bases worked(unlike 1980''s AutoAmerican where the group received a mostly poor reception). Before the reggae flavored, "The Tide is High," there was "Die Young, Stay Pretty," "The Hardest Part" moved to a funk groove, and "Accidents Never Happen," a personal favorite, is one of the best songs Debbie and the band ever brought to vinyl.
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Eugenius
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nostalgic
Reviewed in the United States on March 3, 2021
My wife and I received a box of old records. Unfortunately this album (30 something years old) was chewed up by an animal. This recreation is very close to the original. Original made in USA. Remake was made in UK.
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Cheryl M. Calhoun
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My favorite Blondie album
Reviewed in the United States on August 26, 2012
I had this on vinyl and played it to death when I was a teenager. When I got this disc, I played it immediately and it is strange....I knew almost every word after not listening to it for 25+ years! It is etched into my brain from listening to it so much in those formative... See more
I had this on vinyl and played it to death when I was a teenager. When I got this disc, I played it immediately and it is strange....I knew almost every word after not listening to it for 25+ years! It is etched into my brain from listening to it so much in those formative years! This album was "outshined" by Parallel Lines, but I think it is better album overall. I love Union City Blue and Shayla - they really showcase Debbie''s voice. And of course Dreaming, Atomic - I love all the songs, even Victor - no fast forwarding through any songs here. You will not be disappointed with this purchase!
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Mark Lahren
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great, but....
Reviewed in the United States on September 20, 2007
I''m ecstatic that I''m finally able to watch the DVD version of this album without paying exhorbitant online auction prices for the VHS version (note that the prices for those VHS versions have dropped substantially with this DVD release). One nit: I wish the audio quality... See more
I''m ecstatic that I''m finally able to watch the DVD version of this album without paying exhorbitant online auction prices for the VHS version (note that the prices for those VHS versions have dropped substantially with this DVD release). One nit: I wish the audio quality of the DVD was as good as the CD. I''m sure it was just transfered from the original master video, so it''s a faithful re-release, but how hard would it have been to get the CD audio quality transfered to the video version? Listening to the DVD audio even through an excellent sound system, sounds like you''re listening to it through TV speakers. It isn''t terrible by any means, but it pales when compared to the CD audio.

Otherwise, no complaints. Video quality is excellent, considering the age of the source material, and audio quality of the CD is superb. Easily the best money I''ve spent all year. A must-have for all Blondie fans.
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ADRIENNE MILLER
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"I am free but life is so cheap..."
Reviewed in the United States on October 29, 2013
This was a great band that were around before I was born. And it''s a good thing that their music still holds up 30+ years later. This album, "Eat to the Beat" tends to get lost in the shuffle since it''s stuck in between their breakthrough album, "Parallel Lines" and the... See more
This was a great band that were around before I was born. And it''s a good thing that their music still holds up 30+ years later. This album, "Eat to the Beat" tends to get lost in the shuffle since it''s stuck in between their breakthrough album, "Parallel Lines" and the avant-garde "Autoamerican". And I find that really sad because I think "Eat to the Beat" is a flawless album from to start to finish. No filler here, I promise. What makes this album so special is the variety. You get a little bit of everything: their signature new wave cuts, sassy, sweaty punk, glossy but sophisticated pop, their first stab at reggae, and even a sweet, gentle lullaby. "Atomic", "Accidents Never Happen", and "The Hardest Part" round up the new wave juggernauts. "Atomic" has always been one of my favorite Blondie songs. I like the strong undertone of electronica running through the beat and there''s great drumming from Clem Burke. "Accidents Never Happen" is a song I have soft spot for because I like keyboardist Jimmy Destri''s songwriting and catchy melodies. "The Hardest Part" is just pure fun, love the raw edginess. As for the punk songs, I think these songs are quite brilliant. "Living in the Real World" is full of cynism and the title track is hyper and I love the harmonica playing throughout the song. And just to clarify something, when Blondie was first starting out, they were a punk band before they ventured in to new wave terrain. But if you want to know the song that I think is the BEST track here is the punk gem, "Victor". Oh my god, this song is insane! Debbie Harry''s scream is out-of-this world good, actually it''s scary how good it is. I can''t stop listening to "Victor" - (love the guitar riff and endless chord changes) you can feel Debbie''s anguish and desperation when she belts, "I don''t want you to go, please don''t leave me alone!" And now we dive into the pop gems. I think these next 4 tracks I will discuss are the highlights here. They are beautiful, complicated, and heartbreaking. The opening track "Dreaming" is so romantic and well...dreamy. I adore this song and the lyric: "You asked me what''s my pleasure, a movie or a measure? I''ll have a cup of tea and tell you all my dreaming, dreaming is free..." There''s another Jimmy Destri penned track called "Slow Motion" which sounds like a 1960''s girl group Phil Spector-inspired song. It''s bouncy, breezy, and the hook is irresistible. The "meat and potatoes" part of the album includes "Union City Blue" which packs a hard-hitting emotional punch to the gut and "Shayla" written by Chris Stein. "Shayla" could be Blondie''s most underrated song. Just thinking about the lyrical content makes me want to weep. It''s about a lonely, hard-working girl who feels hopeless and isolated: "Years of fear were in her way, lost in space and down she came..." "Shayla" in my opinion contains Debbie''s best vocal. But to be honest, this whole album proved Debbie could sing her butt off. Her voice was rich and her personality was so fiery, how can you not love her? And it didn''t hurt that she was so photogenic (that girl had killer bone structure). Debbie was also a great songwriter as well, on this album she co-wrote 8 out of the 12 tracks. So not only was she drop-dead gorgeous, she also had a brain too. But back to the songs! "Die Young Stay Pretty" has Blondie experimenting with reggae and Debbie encourages us "to live fast, ''cause it won''t last..." "Sound-A-Sleep" is an unexpected, angelic lullaby that will surely cure anyone suffering from insomnia. I also wanted to mention there are 4 bonus tracks (ALL live versions) which in include: "Die Young Stay Pretty", and the rest are covers. The first cover is the Four Tops'' "Seven Rooms of Gloom", David Bowie''s "Heroes", and Johnny Cash''s "Ring of Fire". As you can tell, I love "Eat to the Beat". This album is digitally remastered. The sound quality is awesome, and there''s a short essay written by producer Mike Chapman which gives the listener some helpful insight about the making-of this album from back in the day. I highly recommend this album. You won''t regret it. Enjoy!
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Top reviews from other countries

P. Frizelle
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
In Love at 16 Divorced by 56
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 5, 2019
Following up the massive success of ''Parallel Lines'' must have been a daunting prospect for Blondie. Success or becoming top dog is a creature that breeds unpredictable things, do you stick to your convictions or do you compromise them. After all your half way up the ladder...See more
Following up the massive success of ''Parallel Lines'' must have been a daunting prospect for Blondie. Success or becoming top dog is a creature that breeds unpredictable things, do you stick to your convictions or do you compromise them. After all your half way up the ladder now with a few $$$$$$$ in your back pocket. The gutter underbelly of NYC and the GBGB’s was gone and the desire to make it on their own terms. This was Blondie but missing their heart and soul. In retrospect this album is a jittery light footedness mess. Under pressure to follow up Parallel Lines (which was really a producer’s album) Eat to the Beat was the beginning of the end for Blondie. Trying to cash in started to sound a bit like like the American ABBA The problem with Blondie is that they did not know what musical identity they wanted and to add the frustration all eyes were firmly fixed on miss Debbie Harry. However, this album did generate three massive ''hit'' singles in ''Dreaming'', ''Union City Blue'' and ''Atomic''. But let’s be clear by now the marketing was not really on Blondie but Debbie Harry. But fate is cruel mistress Debbie was a natural beauty with raw sex appeal (With her clothes on) but by now she was a marionette with designers and makeup artist creating her look. I was 16 years old when I brought this album. And let’s face it I brought it for one reason only Debbie. At 16 I had not been exposed to the pantheon of music, bands and artists that had gone before ore were waiting in the shadows. With todays ears and older head this is a pleasant but very mediocre album but with nothing memorable or that outstanding. The problem with Blondie is that they tried too hard to musically diversify without mastering any. It must be said without Debbie’s smouldering appeal and photogenic love affair with the camera they would have disappeared onto the unground of forgotten bands Producer Mike Chapman was responsible (against their will) for cohering them to evolve to a more refined sound with rock instruments and some synthesizer. The frustrating thing with BLONDIE is that every other album they released is sounds so transitional. EAT TO THE BEAT is just that. It''s kind of in the same vein as PARRALELL LINES but not as light weight and catchy. Apart from the ace single ''Dreaming'', EAT TO THE BEAT is an uncomfortable experience. The attempt at big production leaves the band sounding void and cold. Their personality does not quite resonate through. The songs are lazy and androgynous with no real meaning or message. Hanging on the Telephone form PARRALELL LINES for example draws you in chews you up and castrates you before spitting you out. Side one starts off great with ‘Dreaming’ a classic Blondie song, then the album proceeds through a mix of new, garage/punk pop, rock, a lullaby, calypso beats and reggae. Too much variety in my opining to forge a sonic identity. You can hear a solid theme and continuity with their debut Blondie “surf rock” sound and sophomore Plastic Letters “new wave” guitar approach. Eat to the Beat is a messy affair and a chance for the music industry to capitalise on the golden goose before it stops laying eggs. ‘Atomic’ opens side two has a killer bass, a pulsing beat, really what I bought the album for, best song on side two, which is not as good as side one. Most people and critics agree the end of the album contains a few duffers. ''Sound-A-Sleep'' (the lullaby) is ultimately pointless and ''Victor'' is truly horrible filler Call Me a standalone single was far superior it was sharp with a slick edge and sexy as hell without breaking into a sweat. The fact remains that the group had peaked with "Parallel Lines" and you sense they half-know it too. The undertone edginess and gritty subversions are gone. They don’t sound as energetic as they used to be. They are clearly moving more towards the pop market and losing their edge along the way which only went on a downwards spiral towards the end of their career.
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Mandrek Larl
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''ve said it before, if you''re only going to buy one Blondie album then buy "Parallel Lines" ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 14, 2021
After reaching the mountain top with their album of punk-power pop par excellence "Parallel Lines" there really was only one way [or another- sorry couldn''t resist that] for Blondie, but with hindsight whatever route they chose the direction was always going to be down....See more
After reaching the mountain top with their album of punk-power pop par excellence "Parallel Lines" there really was only one way [or another- sorry couldn''t resist that] for Blondie, but with hindsight whatever route they chose the direction was always going to be down. Like many people I bought "Eat To The Beat" when it was originally released only to be disappointed expecting better from Debbie Harry, then at the top of her game, and the now six piece Blondie. So today I am listening afresh to "Eat To The Beat", but this time it''s the cut-price 2001 CD reissue. It''s not that "Eat To The Beat" is a bad album, after all it does contain a three of Blondie''s very best songs in "Dreaming", "Union City Blue" and "Atomic", but it''s still disappointing: the quality control is missing and with its variety of styles: pop, punk, reggae, funk and a truly ghastly lullaby it lacks end-to-end cohesion and consistency, not a charge you could level at its predecessor. But "Eat To The Beat" gets off to a flying start with a trio of singles. Opening with the superb "Dreaming " a UK number two, followed by the hard rocking US single "The Hardest Part" and then possibly my all-time favourite Blondie song, the UK single "Union City Blue". What a start, what trio of songs, and I often used to stop there because, with the exception of "Atomic", the rest of the album fails to reach these heights. "Shayla", the fourth track is a ballad, ok, but the instrumentation has touches of prog and for much of the song it just doesn''t sound like Blondie. The title track "Eat To The Beat" has a punky drive that sets my toes tapping and some wonderful harmonica, it''s good but sounds a bit raw in this company [would have worked well on the eponymous debut or "Plastic Letters" but not here]; "Accidents Never Happen" is a bit too close to being Blondie by numbers and would be a throwaway if it wasn''t for the extended outro that closed the original first side. Side two was never as good as side one. Opening with "Die Young Stay Pretty", an awful piece of rap, yes I know this was 1979 and everyone was climbing on the rap appropriation band-wagon, but this must have been the worst of the lot! And it''s followed by the sham early 60s girl group sound of "Slow Motion" which doesn''t do anything for me. But then things get better, a whole lot of better with "Atomic", and quite frankly it''s the only reason I ever had for playing side two. This is the album version not the single version, it opens with the extended intro that builds on the three blind mice theme, and has an extended down and dirty funky middle eight; I have never understood why I love this song with its rock meets disco sound, on paper it should be everything I hate, but it isn''t, its a masterpiece of song-writing and a guilty pleasure. The less said about the lullaby "Sound-A-Sleep" the better [and that''s way far more than it deserves]; I still don''t get the curious mash-up of ideas that is "Victor", I can''t imagine that anyone actually thought this worked when they recorded it, maybe they just thought it would be kind to give Frank Infante a writing credit; and closer "Living In The Real World" is a an up-tempo punky thrash, given the weird mix of styles on the second side I assume they thought why not throw this in as well while they were about it? It''s Ok but never gave me a reason for playing the whole of side two So it''s very good in a few places, ok''ish in some, but really very bad in the others, it''s no "Parallel Lines" and that''s why this is still only a three star album for me. But my release then has four bonus track. I don''t normally review bonus tracks but on this rare occasion they actually add value. The first of these is a live recording of "Die Young Stay Pretty" which is far better than the album''s studio recording and I have to take some of my earlier comments back, but why didn''t they record it like this in the first place? Next up is a cover of the Four Tops'' "Seven Rooms of Gloom" and it''s another thumbs up; then there''s a sublime close-but-not-too-close cover of Bowie''s "Heroes"; and finally there''s a cover of Johnny Cash''s "Ring Of Fire", ok so perhaps not all the bonus tracks are a bonus but three out of four ain''t bad! But it''s these bonus tracks that rescue this package, and that''s fundamentally wrong in my mind, but it''s makes this album worth a cut-price punt. But, and as I''ve said before, if you''re only going to buy one Blondie album buy "Parallel Lines".
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simon k
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
GREAT ALBUM.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 3, 2021
CLASSIC BLONDIE, THE BAND WERE AT THEIR VERY BEST LIVE HERE AND ONWARDS FOR A WHILE AFTER WITH AUTOAMERICAN . THERE WILL NEVER BE ANOTHER BAND LIKE THIS.
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Ken Parker
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic CD
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 19, 2019
Remastered cd sounding like it was recorded yesterday, amazing sound, amazing tracks and an amazing voice in Debbie Harry...
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Lord Banks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Blondie ''Eat to the Beat''
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 25, 2012
The CD arrived on time and un-damaged. Blondie is and always will be my favourite pop band. I started listening to them in 1978 when I was at school! As with many other school boys of my age my walls were covered with Debbie Harry posters. I have been lucky enough to see...See more
The CD arrived on time and un-damaged. Blondie is and always will be my favourite pop band. I started listening to them in 1978 when I was at school! As with many other school boys of my age my walls were covered with Debbie Harry posters. I have been lucky enough to see the band live twice on their revamped line up once in 1999 and then in 2002.Eat to the beat was the next album to be released after Parallel Lines. Its a great album worthy of any Blondie fans collection.
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